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Case Reports
November 1941

CONGENITAL MELANOMA: REPORT OF A CASE IN WHICH ANTENATAL METASTASIS OCCURRED

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.; BINGHAMTON, N. Y.
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology of the Gallinger Municipal Hospital and of Georgetown University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1941;62(5):1029-1040. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000170123011
Abstract

The presence of pigmented nevi on the skin of infants at birth, while unusual, is well known. Such lesions vary considerably in size and may cover almost the whole body surface. They are generally regarded as being entirely benign or of very low malignancy at this age period.1 In an exhaustive review of the literature, Wells2 was able to find only 5 instances of malignant melanoma in early infancy. The only case in which he thought it even probable that a pigmented mole had been malignant before birth was that reported by Coe3 in 1925, in which small moles present at birth caused death at 4 months of age. In another instance, an infant at birth "had innumerable gray-brown spots up to bean size over the entire body." The infant, who died at 7 months of age of tuberculosis, had nodules of melanosarcoma in the brain. Details are

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