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Progress in Pediatrics
May 1942

DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF DOUBLE CUBICLE SYSTEM FOR PROTECTING BABIES IN NURSERIES

Author Affiliations

Director of Laboratories of Bacteriology; Associate Professor of Biology, University of Notre Dame NOTRE DAME, IND.

Am J Dis Child. 1942;63(5):934-944. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1942.02010050098011
Abstract

THEORY  Maintaining infants in large groups, as in nurseries and in homes for foundlings, creates the problem of cross infection. One solution of this problem involves isolation of infants one from the other, so that vector lines can be reduced to a few which are well defined. Infants grouped together in a room and attended by various persons concerned with their care and maintenance are the focus of many complex and interacting vector lines. For purposes of convenience the vectors can be divided into two groups: air-borne vectors and contact vectors. Actually, however, it should be noted that such a division is a matter of convenience, as vectors are interchangeable.Infants may be isolated from each other by surrounding them with mechanical barriers in the form of a cubicle, which must be so designed that the baby is easily handled and observed. Furthermore, unless the mother is isolated with the

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