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April 1943

ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FOETALIS (ACUTE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA OF THE NEWBORN): PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
From the Blood Laboratory of the Boston Dispensary, the Boston Floating Hospital and the Joseph H. Pratt Diagnostic Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1943;65(4):571-581. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1943.02010160055006
Abstract

The purpose of this communication is to present evidence that erythroblastosis foetalis is primarily an acute hemolytic anemia of the newborn, due probably to an agglutinative-hemolytic process.

This concept is not new. The theory that fetal erythrocytes may enter the maternal circulation, immunize the mother and produce antibodies which subsequently pass through the placenta and act on the blood and tissues of the fetus was suggested as a cause of jaundice of the newborn by Ottenberg1 in 1923. Hampson2 (1929) expressed the belief that icterus gravis is the result of failure by the newborn child to produce a hypothetic antihemolytic hormone previously provided by its mother. Parsons, Hawksley and Gittins3 and Hawksley and Lightwood4 also went on record as regarding the intense erythroblastic reaction of the blood as secondary to a hemolytic process. Later Ross and Waugh5 stated that there are two types of icterus

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