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Case Reports
July 1943

POIKILOTHERMIA IN AN ACHONDROPLASTIC DWARFRESULTS OF MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PRODUCTION AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES

Am J Dis Child. 1943;66(1):37-42. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1943.02010190044006
Abstract

Poikilothermia may be defined as a state wherein the body temperature of an organism tends to approach at all times that of the surrounding medium. No thermostatic control from within is present to maintain a constant body temperature by increasing or decreasing heat production and storage as the environmental temperature changes.

A transient state of poikilothermia is occasionally observed in premature infants, but it seldom persists after the first week of life. It is usually regarded as a sign of immaturity of the central nervous system. Aside from this, poikilothermia in human beings is a rare condition. The only case that has come to our attention is that reported by Davidson and Friedman.1 Their patient was an infant who during his twenty-nine days of life showed instability of body temperature, tremors, athetosis and xanthochromia of the spinal fluid. At autopsy the hypothalamic nuclei were found to be extensively invaded

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