[Skip to Navigation]
Other Articles
February 1945

CHANGES IN THE VIBRATORY SENSE OF PATIENTS WITH POLIOMYELITIS: AS MEASURED BY THE PALLESTHESIOMETER

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Research Laboratories, S. M. A. Corporation; the Department of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University.

Am J Dis Child. 1945;69(2):89-91. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1945.02020140021003
Abstract

In poliomyelitis there are obvious pathologic changes in the posterior as well as in the anterior area of the spinal cord and in the cells of the sensory ganglions outside the cord. Nevertheless, after the first attack of pain, which is nearly segmental, sensation seems uninvolved. It may be that sensory involvement has not been demonstrated clinically because the ordinary methods of measurement at the disposal of physicians are too gross to detect minute quantitative or qualitative changes in sensation. A recently developed pallesthesiometer has been found satisfactory in other neurologic studies, and it was decided to test patients with poliomyelitis by means of this instrument.

METHOD  Mechanism of the Instrument.—The pallesthesiometer quantitatively measures the vibratory sense. The one used in the present studies has been described in detail in an article published elsewhere.1 It consists of a disk or button which vibrates in a vertical plane. The

×