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Case Reports
February 1945

ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS IN MOTHERS WITH RH-POSITIVE BLOOD: REPORT OF SIX CASES, WITH COMMENT ON ISOIMMUNIZATION WITH THE "A" AND "B" AGGLUTINOGENS

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Department of Pathology, Cumberland and Prospect Heights Hospitals.

Am J Dis Child. 1945;69(2):99-102. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1945.02020140031005
Abstract

The recent work of Dr. Philip Levine and his co-workers1 has established two fundamental concepts: (1) the induction of isoimmunization of a pregnant woman by antigens of the fetus (or products of conception), inherited from the father, and (2) pathogenesis of the various maternal and neonatal diseases which may result from isoimmunization. Dr. Levine's work has revolutionized some of the teachings of immunologists, and therefore it is fitting that these new concepts be named the Levine phenomenon.

The theory of isoimmunization was developed by Levine and Stetson2 in 1937, from the study of a patient who, after delivery of a child, had a transfusion reaction to blood of her own group. Her blood, as well as that of her donor, belonged to group O; yet her serum was found to contain atypical agglutinations which clumped the red cells of most group O bloods. This atypical agglutinin disappeared after

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