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Progress in Pediatrics
November 1945

THE RHEUMATIC FEVER PROBLEM: II. APPROACHES AWAITING DEVELOPMENT

Author Affiliations

U.S.N.R.
Benjamin Knox Rachford Lecture, delivered at Children's Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Jan. 17, 1945.

Am J Dis Child. 1945;70(5):348-358. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1945.02020230088016
Abstract

The clinician sees disease problems as they are presented by Nature. He has access to the knowledge accumulated in medical books and to recent experimental findings recorded in scientific papers. It is, nevertheless, difficult for the clinician to correlate the findings of the laboratory with his observations at the bedside, and yet progress depends on his defining for the investigator the clinical problems awaiting solution. The solution of important disease problems requires that the man who works in the "field" with Nature's phenomena have a close liaison with the man who by his training in fundamental sciences is equipped to direct laboratory methods. This is especially true in the study of rheumatic fever, and it is in the role of liaison between clinician and investigator that I should like to present this lecture. The material to be presented will be highly speculative. It will include possible attacks on the problem

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