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Progress in Pediatrics
March 1946

Progress in Pediatrics: CORONARY OCCLUSIVE DISEASE IN INFANTS AND IN CHILDREN

Am J Dis Child. 1946;71(3):280-300. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1946.02020260073007
Abstract

THE age at which coronary occlusive disease is of importance in differential diagnosis has been lowered steadily as knowledge of that disease has increased. Previously considered a disease of middleaged or elderly persons, and so described in most of the standard textbooks, occluding coronary lesions are fairly frequent in young adults, as shown by the recent report of French and Dock.1 These authors reviewed the findings in 80 cases of fatal coronary arteriosclerosis in young soldiers. Five of the patients were in the group from 20 to 22 years and 9 in the group from 23 to 25 years. The lesion present in every case was arteriosclerosis of the same atheromatous type as commonly found in older persons. Weinstein2 has recently shown that coronary disease, by him called "atypical" because of its origin, may appear also in young persons as a feature of rheumatic fever, either in the

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