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Case Reports
March 1947

XANTHOMA TUBEROSUM, AORTIC STENOSIS, CORONARY SCLEROSIS AND ANGINA PECTORIS: Report of a Case in a Boy Thirteen Years of Age

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Pediatrics, Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER, MINN.; SUPERIOR, WIS.; DULUTH, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

Am J Dis Child. 1947;73(3):326-333. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1947.02020380071005
Abstract

DISEASE of the coronary arteries alone or with angina pectoris is rarely found in children. For that reason it is thought of interest and importance to report the case of a boy 13 years of age who had xanthoma tuberosum, a typical history of angina pectoris and significant changes in the electrocardiogram, and to review similar cases from the literature.

REPORT OF A CASE  The patient, a boy 13 years old, was first seen at the Mayo Clinic on Aug. 22, 1945. Seven years previously soft, fluctuant, yellowish pink, circumscribed tumors had begun to develop on the elbows, knees, ankles, joints of the fingers and toes and the buttocks. On two occasions similar lesions had been removed surgically from the heel and knee, and they had been reported to contain white material "like cottage cheese." The masses had never been tender. For six to eight months before admission the patient

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