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January 1948

BLOOD LEVELS OF PENICILLIN WITH ORAL USE OF BUFFERED AND UNBUFFERED SOLUTIONS: Studies on a Series of Infants and Children

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Pediatrics and Bacteriology, Beth Israel Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1948;75(1):15-23. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1948.02030020022003
Abstract

THE PRACTICAL advantages of oral administration of penicillin over intramuscular injection are obvious, especially in pediatric practice. The psychic trauma associated with injections is a constant concern to all physicians who treat children. Moreover, the necessity of repeating the injections at frequent intervals makes it difficult to administer the drug in the patient's home, as the procedure requires the attendance of a nurse or repeated visits by the physician. Recent reports1 concerning the clinical effectiveness of penicillin administered orally have been most encouraging and indicate that the drug will be used in this manner with increasing frequency in the near future.

A divergence of opinion exists as to the necessity of buffering penicillin when it is administered orally. Thus, György and his associateslb and Broh-Khan and Pedrick,2 among others,3 asserted that

(Footnote continued on next page) superior blood levels of the drug occurred with the use

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