[Skip to Navigation]
Other Articles
July 1948

RHEUMATIC INFECTION IN CHILDHOOD: FIFTEEN TO TWENTY YEAR FOLLOW-UP: Caution Against Early Ambulant Therapy

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania Medical School.

Am J Dis Child. 1948;76(1):46-52. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1948.02030030053005
Abstract

IN A PREVIOUS paper1 an analysis was presented of the outcome of rheumatic infection ten years after onset in a group of patients whose initial illness had occurred during the period 1923 to 1937, inclusive. The original group comprised 588 children, of whom 537 (91.3 per cent) had been located at the end of the ten year period. At the termination of the initial attack, 60 per cent had shown evidence of the presence of rheumatic heart disease. Of these 318 children with clinical evidence of heart disease at onset, signs of cardiac involvement had disappeared in 9 per cent. Forty-two per cent of those with early signs of rheumatic heart disease had died of rheumatic infection or bacterial endocarditis. Of 219 patients without clinical evidence of heart disease at the termination of their first attack, 77 per cent still did not show evidence of heart disease ten years

×