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Progress in Pediatrics
February 1949

OFFICE MANAGEMENT OF THE ALLERGIC CHILD

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Am J Dis Child. 1949;77(2):217-243. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1949.02030040226006
Abstract

IN A discussion of this subject it is pertinent to point out the essential differences between the allergist who is a pediatrician and the allergist who is an internist. Many of the allergists who are internists, and this includes younger as well as older physicians, feel that there is no such thing, properly speaking, as pediatric allergy. They point with pride to the large number of children in their practices, particularly those who flock in all day Saturday for their injections of pollen or dust extracts and vaccine. However, a close examination of the makeup of the majority of such practices, as concerns pediatrics, reveals that most of these patients are afflicted with typical pollinosis or typical bronchial asthma, the treatment of which is not essentially different in children, at least beyond the age of 2 or 3 years, from that in adults. In fact, the internist-allergist can generally treat

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