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December 1915

ACUTE MYELITIS FOLLOWING VARICELLA: REPORT OF A CASE

Am J Dis Child. 1915;X(6):445-446. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1915.04110060050007
Abstract

It is believed that almost any of the infectious diseases may attack the central nervous system to produce encephalitis or myelitis. The following is a list of those mentioned: Typhoid fever, typhus fever, erysipelas, malaria, variola, measles, acute rheumatism, severe puerperal infections, scarlatina, influenza, pneumonia, pertussis, dysentery, cholera, gonorrhea, streptococcus and staphylococcus infections. Only one author (Councilman) has in recent years mentioned varicella as a possible cause. The case that I am now reporting bears such a close relationship to an attack of varicella that I consider it of sufficient interest to record.

History.  —The patient, R. T., a white boy, 7 years of age, applied for treatment at the dispensary of the Harriet Lane Home, Aug. 17, 1914, complaining of "stiff knees."

Family History.  —Unimportant.

Personal History.  —The patient was a full term child, following a normal delivery. He was breast fed for eighteen months, and cut his first

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