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August 1916

INFANTILE SCURVY: III. ITS INFLUENCE ON GROWTH (LENGTH AND WEIGHT)

Am J Dis Child. 1916;XII(2):152-165. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1916.04110140045007
Abstract

In two previous papers1 on this subject it was shown that pasteurized milk, that is, milk heated to 145 F. for thirty minutes, gradually induces infantile scurvy, unless antiscorbutic diet is given in addition. The fact that this disorder quickly yielded to the substitution of raw for pasteurized milk, or to the addition to the diet of an ounce of orange juice, or the juice of orange peel, was regarded as satisfactory evidence of the true scorbutic nature of the disturbance. The type of malnutrition which gradually develops from a diet of pasteurized milk may be termed subacute scurvy, as it takes some months to develop and, as a rule, does not manifest the pronounced symptoms characteristic of the classic case. In some instances, however, we encounter subperiosteal hemorrhages and the hemorrhagic gums typical of this disorder. That infantile scurvy is not met with more commonly, in view of

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