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December 1916

CONGENITAL OBLITERATION OF THE AORTA: WITH REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Pathology, Michael Reese Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1916;XII(6):606-611. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1916.04110180068006
Abstract

Congenital obliteration of the aorta occurs in two main forms: closure at the orifice, so-called atresia ostii aortae; and at the isthmus, referred to as coarctation.

These two forms present different clinical aspects. Coarctation is of greater frequency. Abbott1 states that over 200 cases have been reported. This lesion occurs in that part of the aorta lying between the left subclavian artery and the insertion of the ductus arteriosus. Patients having this anomaly may reach adult life. Recently LeCount2 demonstrated a specimen removed from the body of a man 42 years old. The greatest age reached occurred in an instance recorded by Reynaud, cited by Hochsinger,3 in which the patient was 92 years old. The clinical signs, as summarized by Hirschfelder,4 are difference in the size and quality of the pulse in the upper and lower extremities; difference in the blood pressure in the upper and

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