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Clinical Department
May 1918

THE TREATMENT OF ENURESIS WITHOUT DRUGS: WITH A REPORT OF THIRTY-FOUR CONSECUTIVE RECOVERIES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Pediatrics, Tufts College Medical School BOSTON

Am J Dis Child. 1918;XV(5):339-347. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1918.04110230028004
Abstract

Enuresis may be caused by organic diseases and by malformations. The present discussion, however, has to do only with the incontinence of urine ordinarily seen in childhood.

In order to understand the treatment of this condition, it is necessary to know so far as possible the physiology of normal urination. This was described by Goltz1 in 1874, and the general principles set forth by him at that time have continued to be accepted with little modification. Stated in its simplest terms, the act of micturition may be described as follows:2 Gradual distention of the bladder induces rhythmic contraction of its walls. This contraction increases until a few drops of urine are expressed into the posterior urethra, causing a sensory stimulus, the afferent part of the reflex, which, passing to its nerve center in the lumbosacral cord, arouses the afferent impulses by which the bladder is made to contract

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