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Article
April 1914

STUDIES ON THE INCUBATION PERIOD. NO. 1—SERUM DISEASE

Am J Dis Child. 1914;VII(4):253-291. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1914.04100400002001
Abstract

By way of review it may be said the knowledge that has come to us through the biochemic reactions which take place when horse-serum is injected into the body has compelled us materially to alter our conception of the incubation period. Formerly we contented ourselves with the belief that the time which elapses after the pathogenic substance enters the body until the development of the first symptoms of the disease is the incubation period. By this we meant that the causal agent entered and grew in the body until it had reached a sufficient amount to bring about disease symptoms; in other words, that the invading army increased in size from day to day until it was able to overcome the natural resisting forces of the body. We now know that certain substances, such as horse-serum and egg albumin, when injected into the body require a certain length of time

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