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Article
September 1916

SCARLET FEVER, MORBIDITY AND FATALITY: BASED ON SEVERAL MILLION CASES

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Am J Dis Child. 1916;XII(3):205-232. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1916.04110150003001
Abstract

Certain families are more susceptible to scarlet fever than others. Physicians in active practice in contagious hospitals and elsewhere are familiar with this fact, because all the children in some families have the disease, whereas the rule is for but one or two of a number of brothers and sisters exposed to have scarlet fever. Besides this, physicians know that certain types of children—fat, flabby, overnourished and pasty children—bear the disease badly, and this gives rise to the knowledge that there is a variation in individual susceptibility. Could these differences in family and individual susceptibilities account for differences in fatality between different small epidemics of scarlet fever? Suppose that large collections of cases in various parts of the world were studied and compared, would it be found, with all types of individuals and families included, that scarlet fever after all was a fairly uniform disease, attacking year in and year

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