[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.234.223.162. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1918

INTESTINAL INTOXICATION IN INFANTS: THE IMPORTANCE OF IMPAIRED RENAL FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the children's service at Bellevue Hospital (Dr. L. E. La Fétra, director) and the Pathological Laboratory of Bellevue Hospital (Dr. Charles Norris, director).

Am J Dis Child. 1918;XV(3):165-189. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1918.04110210002001
Abstract

Preceding the development of toxic symptoms in intestinal intoxication1 there is pronounced diarrhea, vomiting and diminished ingestion of fluid, the relative importance of which varies in different cases. In the acute stage of the symptoms the excretion of urine is greatly diminished, and at this time the urine contains albumin and abundant casts.

During the past year investigation of cases of intestinal intoxication has furnished evidence which emphasizes the importance of the loss of fluid and the impaired secretion of urine. In this communication it is proposed to present such evidence and to discuss its significance with special reference to the symptomatology.

I. NONPROTEIN NITROGEN AND UREA OF THE BLOOD 

Technic.2  —The nonprotein nitrogen was determined by the method of Gettler and Baker3 except that the final determination was by aeration instead of by distillation. Fiftieth-normal acid and hundredth-normal alkali were used with methyl red as indicator.

×