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Article
November 1925

ETIOLOGY OF CHRONIC INTESTINAL INDIGESTION: CHEMICAL AND BACTERIOLOGIC INVESTIGATION

Author Affiliations

TORONTO, CANADA
From the Wards and Laboratories of the Hospital for Sick Children, and the Sub-Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto.

Am J Dis Child. 1925;30(5):603-631. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1925.01920170007001
Abstract

The studies reported in this paper were undertaken in consequence of some clinical and chemical observations made by us on the condition of chronic intestinal indigestion, particularly in relation to treatment with special high protein diets.1 It seemed desirable to attempt to explain certain apparently contradictory phenomena, and if possible to formulate a rational explanation of the successful use of extremely high protein diets in overcoming this condition.

The first question that comes to mind concerns the well-known characteristics of the typical feces, namely, mushy consistency, often acid reaction, suggesting abnormal fermentative activity in the intestinal tract, but accompanied almost invariably by a markedly putrefactive odor. How are the symptoms of two antagonistic forms of bacterial activity to be accounted for? That a fermentative condition prevails is supported by the abdominal distension characteristic of the condition, and by the exaggeration of symptoms when more carbohydrate is added to the

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