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Article
February 1931

IS FAMILIAL JAUNDICE OF NEW-BORN INFANTS ERYTHROBLASTOSIS?REPORT OF TWO CASES

Am J Dis Child. 1931;41(2):225-235. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1931.01940080003001
Abstract

Familial jaundice of new-born infants was first described by Pfannenstiel.1 The clinical features are afebrile jaundice, peculiar to certain families and the tendency to occur in successive pregnancies. The children appear to be normal at birth, but they die a few days later as the result of a grave and progressive icterus. The stools are not acholic, but the urine usually contains bile pigment. The liver and spleen are enlarged as a rule. Death following a collapse usually occurs in a few days.

Abt2 stated that the condition has nothing in common with Winckel's or Buhl's disease; that, in a sense, the children are defective, and that they soon become incapacitated to carry on extra-uterine life. He did not believe that the condition is due to an injury at birth or to toxemia of pregnancy. Rolleston,3 in a study of 25 family groups, found that in 15 of

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