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Article
February 1934

THE BLOOD DURING THE FIRST YEAR OF LIFE: II. THE ANEMIA OF PREMATURITY

Author Affiliations

WITH THE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE OF RAY BENNETT NEW YORK
From the Department of Diseases of Children, the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, the Babies' Hospital and the Sloane Hospital for Women.

Am J Dis Child. 1934;47(2):261-301. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1934.01960090002001
Abstract

That an anemia of variable severity and duration tends to develop in premature infants has long been the general belief among pediatricians. Hess1 spoke of "an anemia which develops quite regularly and strikingly during the first three months of life." Mackay2 mentioned the "early and severe anemia" which occurs in all premature infants. Lucas and Washburn3 stated that premature infants seem particularly prone to the development of a mild degree of anemia during the first six to twelve months of life, and that the erythrocyte count for the average premature infant six months after birth is lower than that of a full term infant at the same age. Parts of this subject have been carefully studied in Germany, and Abt and Nagel4 recently reported on a series of premature infants in this country.

I. SURVEY OF THE LITERATURE  A. Blood Elements in Premature Infants.—1. Erythrocytes

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