[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1935

CEREBRAL MANIFESTATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE OTITIS MEDIA IN INFANCY AND IN EARLY CHILDHOOD: WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE OCCURRENCE OF JACKSONIAN CONVULSIONS, CONJUGATE DEVIATION OF THE HEAD AND EYES AND HEMIPLEGIA

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the departments of neurology of the College of Medical Evangelists and of the University of Southern California and the Los Angeles County Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1935;49(1):1-27. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970010010001
Abstract

In the course of acute infectious diseases of infancy and early childhood, certain cerebral manifestations, especially those indicating involvement of the motor cortex, are not uncommonly observed. These symptoms have been ascribed to a toxic or a general inflammatory reaction of the cerebral cortex or to a vascular lesion consequent to changes in the blood vessels. The condition has come to be known as acute nonsuppurative encephalitis. The term, unfortunately, does not indicate a specific clinical entity and is not associated with a clearcut pathologic picture. It has been applied to any presumed cerebral lesion in patients presenting the history of acute onset of an infectious state which, early in its course, was accompanied by cerebral symptoms. The most common manifestations in such instances are generalized or localized convulsions, which may or may not be followed by hemiplegia. In some instances, the predisposing infection is known, such as one of

×