[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.169.76. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1936

BLOOD PICTURE AFTER SPLENECTOMY IN CHILDREN: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO PLATELETS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Laboratories of the Babies Hospital and Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1936;51(4):765-774. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970160003001
Abstract

The effect of the removal of the spleen is reflected in the blood picture in various ways, depending on the causative factors underlying the indications for splenectomy. Thus, after removal of a previously normal spleen because of sudden rupture due to traumatism, the blood cell count differs from that following removal of an enlarged spleen for chronic hemorrhagic thrombocytopenia or for Cooley's anemia. The most constant change is a rise in the number of platelets, and on this point we have laid special stress, while studying the effect on the other elements of the blood as well.

OBSERVATIONS  Forty-four children on whom splenectomy was performed have been studied. The conditions treated were as follows: traumatic rupture in 3 cases; rheumatic disease in 20; splenomegaly of undetermined origin in 1; congenital hemolytic icterus in 4; Cooley's anemia in 8, and hemorrhagic thrombocytopenia in 8.The ages of the children ranged from

×