[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.175.248.25. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1939

GIANT CELL PNEUMONIA OF INFANCY AS A MANIFESTATION OF VITAMIN A DEFICIENCY

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(3):489-505. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990030003001
Abstract

Giant cell pneumonia (Riesenzellenpneumonie, Hecht;1bronchopneumonie à plasmodes, Masson and Paré2) is a rare pathologic condition occurring in children, usually between the ages of 6 months and 2 years. It most commonly follows measles but may occur as a sequel to other infectious diseases or in association with tuberculosis. There does not appear to be anything to distinguish it clinically from other long-drawn-out, diffuse pneumonias. Histologically, one finds a greater or lesser number of giant cells in alveoli; often they are extremely numerous (fig. 1 A). Careful examination shows that there is a peculiar transformation of the alveolar lining membrane, with thickening, hyalinization and coalescence of the lining cells (fig. 1 B and C). The lesions have been described in detail by Hecht,1 and their development has been studied by Masson and Paré.2 Karsner and Meyers,3 on reconstructing the giant cells, observed that what appeared

×