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Article
May 1939

VIRUS PNEUMONIA OF INFANTS SECONDARY TO EPIDEMIC INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.
From the Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(5):997-1011. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990050003001
Abstract

Morphologic diagnosis of a virus infection encountered in routine postmortem examinations would depend in general, if not always, on the recognition of specific cellular changes such as are now generally accepted as presumptive evidence of an infection of this nature. Especially significant would be the presence of cellular inclusions of certain types, cytoplasmic or nuclear or both. The inclusions of the cytoplasm are sometimes more characteristic of the particular virus concerned than are those which occur within nuclei, and in certain instances they are pathognomonic of the infecting agent. Although intranuclear inclusions are less characteristic of the specific virus, it is probable that they too are unique for each virus that causes them, notwithstanding one's inability to differentiate them accurately at present.

In the diagnosis of a virus infection one also takes into account the type or types of cells involved and the effect on them of the agent concerned,

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