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Article
June 1939

ADSORPTION OF METHYLENE BLUE BY BLOOD OF INFANTS AND CHILDREN: MECHANISM OF REACTION AND CLINICAL APPLICATION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the New York Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(6):1223-1245. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990060003001
Abstract

In the relation between the red blood cells and their environment, the occurrence of adsorptive phenomena is to be expected. The extensive surface presented by the red blood cells and its intimate contact with the diversity of substances contained in plasma provide opportunities for adsorptive processes comparable to those which occur at other interfaces. There have been relatively few studies in which this property of the red blood cells has been investigated.

In a previous study1 a phenomenon was described in which dilute solutions of methylene blue (methylthionine chloride) were decolorized by blood under well defined experimental conditions. Many of the features could be accounted for on the basis of adsorption, and the evidence indicated that the red blood cell was the most important element involved in removal of the dye from solution. The decolorization phenomenon was demonstrated as follows: When a sample of blood from a healthy infant

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