[Skip to Navigation]
Article
March 1945

CELIAC SYNDROME: I: DETERMINATION OF FAT IN FECES; RELIABILITY OF TWO CHEMICAL METHODS AND OF MICROSCOPIC ESTIMATE; EXCRETION OF FECES AND OF FECAL FAT IN NORMAL CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Babies Hospital and the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Am J Dis Child. 1945;69(3):141-151. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1945.02020150002001
Abstract

Steatorrhea is a common finding in infants and children with chronic indigestion and is especially frequent in patients who present the celiac syndrome. The naked eye diagnosis of fatty stool is unreliable, however, for the large foul foamy stools of the patient with celiac disease may or may not contain a relative excess of fat, while the fatty stools of the patient with pancreatic deficiency may appear normal. It is of therapeutic as well as academic interest to distinguish the cases in which there are an excess of fecal fat and consequent gross loss of fat-soluble vitamins from those in which utilization of fat is within normal limits. Fat is normally present in feces, even during starvation1; steatorrhea is correctly defined as the presence of an excess of fat in the stools. Proof of the presence or absence of steatorrhea therefore requires a quantitative method for determination of fecal

Add or change institution
×