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Article
February 1947

PULMONARY CALCIFICATIONS AND SENSITIVITY TO HISTOPLASMIN IN CHARLESTON, S. C.

Am J Dis Child. 1947;73(2):139-142. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1947.02020370003001
Abstract

THE RECENT work of Christie and Peterson1 has definitely established the relationship between sensitivity of the skin to histoplasmin and pulmonary calcifications, and emphasizes its importance in the differential roentgenographic diagnosis of healed primary tuberculosis. Studies by the United States Public Health Service among student nurses have shown a wide divergence in the geographic distribution of sensitivity to histoplasmin.2 The percentage of reactors varies from 68.3 in the Mississippi River basin area to as low as 1 and 2 in the South Atlantic and Northwestern states.

Although Histoplasma capsulatum was established as pathogenic for man in 1906 by Darling and has been reported in more recent literature in 71 clinical cases,3 56 of which were in the United States, there has been no definite establishment clinically of a benign form of the disease producing pulmonary calcifications. Also, it must be granted that the presence of a positive

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