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Article
January 1949

COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF VITAMIN D PREPARATIONS IN PROPHYLACTIC TREATMENT OF PREMATURE INFANTS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Hektoen Institute for Medical Research and the Children's Division of the Cook County Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1949;77(1):1-14. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1949.02030040008001
Abstract

THE NEED of the premature infant for vitamin D has generally been regarded as greater than that of the full term infant. It has been the common practice1 to administer high doses of a concentrate of vitamin D as a measure of safety. Shelling and Hopper2 and Gleich3 suggested daily doses of 1,000 to 2,000 U. S. P. units. Indeed several reports4 indicated that rickets may develop in premature infants even when 2,700 to 5,000 units of vitamin D is administered daily. Such dosages are in great contrast to that of 400 units which Stearns, Jeans and Vandercar5 reported sufficient in full term infants for normal growth and prevention of rickets.

The recent discovery of vitamin D3, formed by irradiation of 7-dehydrocholesterol, and the recognition of the probable presence of this compound in cod liver oil and in the skin of rats and swine

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