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Article
February 1952

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF OLIGOPHRENIA

Author Affiliations

ST. ANDREWS, SCOTLAND

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;83(2):151-153. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040060017001
Abstract

IN THE diagnosis of mental deficiency, dependent as it is not only on medical and psychological criteria but also on social standards, the defect must be distinguished from a considerable number of other conditions. These may conveniently be classified under the headings of intellectual defects of a less ominous nature, specific defects of a visual, auditory, or speech nature, and behavior defects in which the aberrant conduct is likely to be confused with mental defect. The following arrangement may serve to indicate the extent of these conditions:

I.

  • Intellectual defects

    1. Educational defectiveness

    2. Dullness

    3. Backwardness

  • Specific defects

    1. Visual defects

      1. Blindness

      2. Visual cerebral injury

      3. Congenital word blindness

    2. Auditory defects

      1. Deaf-mutism

      2. High-tone deafness

      3. Congenital word deafness

    3. Speech defects

      1. Mutism

  1. Delayed development of speech

  2. Congenital motor aphasia

  • Behavior defects

    1. Delinquency

      1. Maladjustment

      2. Adolescent instability

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