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June 2017

Time for an End to Juice in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children

Author Affiliations
  • 1Section of Integrative Physiology and Metabolism, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2Section of Adult Diabetes, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 3Section of Pediatric Endocrinology, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 4Section of Diabetes and Pregnancy, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
JAMA Pediatr. 2017;171(6):509-510. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0134

As the United States struggles with unprecedented obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemics across not only adulthood, but also childhood and pregnancy, we need effective medical and public health–driven solutions. Removing juice from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) represents an opportunity to make a significant public health impact. In the United States, WIC feeds more than 25% of pregnant women and more than half of children at some point in their first 5 years of life.1 By serving such a large percentage of the population, this program has tremendous potential to influence the country’s dietary patterns.

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