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Comment & Response
February 11, 2019

Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Neonatal Outcomes—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Blavatnik Family Women’s Health Research Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 2Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 3Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
JAMA Pediatr. 2019;173(4):397-398. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.5396

In Reply Our team is pleased that Basso and Gagliardi agree that racial/ethnic disparities in neonatal morbidities in preterm birth subcohorts are likely underestimated.1 They favor estimates across gestational age presented in our article, which conclude disparities are larger than previously reported. However, they note limitations of our analysis using the fetuses-at-risk (FAR) model. We concur that the FAR model is not perfect, as already indicated in our article.1 However, given no model is perfect, shades of gray should not distract from the big picture; the very high risks of neonatal morbidity found in both approaches are important, and clinicians should be aware that the total effect of race/ethnicity is significantly attenuated in subcohorts of preterm births.

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