[Skip to Navigation]
Comment & Response
March 4, 2019

Bubble-Wrapping Halloween—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 2Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 3Centre for Health Evaluation & Outcome Sciences, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 4Faculty of Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 5Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 6Evaluative Clinical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
JAMA Pediatr. 2019;173(5):495. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.0088

In Reply We are pleased our research has inspired more thinking about pedestrian safety and appreciate the opportunity to clarify our findings.1 We found that Halloween was associated with a 43% increase in the relative risk of fatality among pedestrians of any age (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.29-1.59; P < .001) and a 360% increase in the relative risk of fatality for children 17 years or younger (odds ratio, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.81-4.63; P < .001). The average Halloween was associated with about 4 additional deaths for pedestrians of any age, and about 3 of these additional deaths occurred among pedestrians 17 years or younger. This means that Yiannakoulias is off by an order of magnitude in claiming “roughly 1 death per 3 years” in exposure attributable risk.

Add or change institution
×