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Research Letter
August 19, 2019

Identification of Children With High-Intensity Neurological Impairment

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • 3Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research & Delivery Science, Children’s Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, Aurora
  • 4Children’s Hospital Association, Lenexa, Kansas
  • 5Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Monroe Carell Jr Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee
  • 6Pediatric Housestaff, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • 7Complex Care Service, Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
JAMA Pediatr. 2019;173(10):989-991. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.2672

Children with neurological impairment frequently experience unmet health care needs, high-severity acute illnesses, coexisting condition exacerbations, adverse medical events, and disproportionately high health care utilization and spending.1,2 Our clinical experience within the clinical spectrum of neurological impairment has suggested that children with high-intensity neurological impairment have increased severity of health problems, needs, and care. Best practices for managing the acute and chronic health care needs of children with high-intensity neurological impairment are underdeveloped, partly owing to the limited methods of distinguishing these patients.

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