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Article
February 1951

RELATION OF HOMOLOGOUS SERUM HEPATITIS TO PROPHYLACTIC INJECTION OF HUMAN BLOOD FRACTIONS: A Study of 13,755 Cases with Injections

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the pediatric services of Dr. Louis H. Barenberg at the Morrisania City Hospital and the Jewish Memorial Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;81(2):218-225. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040030227005
Abstract

THE RECOGNITION of homologous serum hepatitis as a separate entity focused the attention of the members of the medical profession on the causal relation which exists between this disease and the administration of human blood and plasma. Reports have appeared sporadically in the medical literature of patients in whom hepatitis had developed after their inoculation with some form of human plasma. Hirsch,1 in 1885, described an outbreak of jaundice in a Bremen shipyard among 1,289 workers vaccinated with glycerinated human lymph. Jaundice developed in 191 adults after an incubation period of several weeks or months. In two other groups, of 87 and 500 adults respectively, inoculated with vaccine from a different batch jaundice did not develop. In 1938. Propert2 reported on a series of seven children to whom 4.5 cc. of measles immune serum (human) was given subcutaneously. Three months later, all seven became jaundiced, and three died.

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