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Article
October 1951

EFFECT OF CORTISONE AND CORTICOTROPIN (ACTH) ON THE ACUTE PHASE OF RHEUMATIC FEVER: Further Observations

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1951;82(4):397-425. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1951.02040040415001
Abstract

IT IS widely known that rheumatic fever and rheumatoid arthritis produce marked reactions in the collagen tissues of the body. The evidence that cortisone (compound E; 17-hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone) and corticotropin (ACTH; pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone) were effective in suppressing the disabling reactions in tissues of patients with rheumatoid arthritis suggested at once that the effects of these hormones on the course of rheumatic fever should be investigated. Accordingly, some of us first administered cortisone to a patient with rheumatic fever on March 28, 1949 (Case 1 of this report), and corticotropin to another patient with this disease on May 14, 1949 (Case 4 of this report). In the preliminary report1 of May 25, 1949, it was stated that administration of cortisone during the acute phase of rheumatic fever was attended by rapid disappearance of the following conditions: fever, tachycardia, polyarthritis, elevated sedimentation rates (Westergren method) and abnormal electrocardiographic changes. At the time

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