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Article
March 1952

COR TRILOCULARE BIATRIATUM WITH TRANSPOSITION OF LARGE VESSELS

Author Affiliations

HILVERSUM, NETHERLANDS

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;83(3):333-335. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040070079010
Abstract

AMONG congenital cardiovascular defects, transposition of the great arteries is one which is infrequently found, and it is found more frequently in boys than in girls.1 The survival period will be short unless the defect is combined with septal defects and a patent ductus arteriosus. In Abbott's series of 1,000 patients with congenital cardiovascular defects, 74 showed complete transposition of the aorta and pulmonary artery, but in only 49 was it the primary defect. In 32 of these 49 patients no septal defects existed, while in 17 transposition was combined with an interauricular or interventricular septal defect.

Mannheimer2 found among his 114 cases of morbus caeruleus six patients with transposition of the great vessels with cyanosis at birth; in four patients fits of cyanosis and dyspnea occurred, and five died before the age of 4 months. Polycythemia and clubbing of the fingers and toes generally do not occur in

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