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Article
April 1952

HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS AS THE CAUSE OF FULMINATING VISCERAL DISEASE AND HEPATITIS IN INFANCY: Report of Eight Cases and Isolation of the Virus in One Case

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From the Children's Hospital of Michigan, the Child Research Center of Michigan, and the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Wayne University College of Medicine.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;83(4):421-439. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040080017001
Abstract

THE DISEASES caused by the virus of herpes simplex in man are generally thought of as benign surface infections limited to the skin and mucous membranes. In the rare instances in which the virus invades the central nervous system, the spread is believed to take place along axonal pathways.1 Although primary herpetic stomatitis of infants is commonly associated with rather severe systemic symptoms, and the development of Kaposi's herpetiform eruption would seem to depend on hematogenous spread of the virus,2 visceral lesions definitely attributable to the dissemination of herpes virus by the blood stream have not been recorded heretofore.3 On morphologic grounds, however, this virus has occasionally been suspected as the causative agent for certain obscure lesions of internal organs.4 In 1935, Hass5 described the unique case of a premature infant showing extensive necrosis of the liver and adrenals which, because of the presence of

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