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Article
April 1952

MALIGNANT NEPHROSCLEROSIS WITHOUT RETINAL EDEMA IN A CHILD: Long-Term Observations and Renal Function Studies

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;83(4):493-499. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040080089009
Abstract

ARTERIOLAR nephrosclerosis is the term applied to involvement of the renal area by hypertensive vascular disease. The benign form is characterized by sclerosis of small arteries and arterioles, while the malignant form has in addition necrotizing vascular lesions which involve particularly the vasa afferentia supplying the glomeruli.1 Malignant nephrosclerosis is the typical renal lesion of malignant hypertension, although it is by no means always present in that disease2 and may also occur in far-advanced glomerulonephritis3 and pyelonephritis.4

Malignant hypertension is a clinical condition characterized by persistent hypertension, a progressive downward course, and distinctive changes in the retina (edema of the disc or retina, hemorrhages, and exudates). Renal failure is a late or terminal event.5 The constancy of the typical retinal changes has been emphasized in studies of the disease both in adults6 and in children.7 Excluding cases of far-advanced chronic glomerulonephritis or pyelonephritis,

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