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Article
May 1952

INCIDENCE OF SKIN-TEST REACTIONS AMONG CHILDREN IN THE PITTSBURGH DISTRICT: III. Moniliin

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH
From the Departments of Pathology and Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh and Children's Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;83(5):603-607. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040090049004
Abstract

YEASTS are being isolated from various body foci in increasing numbers of patients admitted to hospitals. The fact is receiving more notice in publications,1 where it is suggested that the yeast flora, normal inhabitants of the body, overgrow, probably after the destruction of bacterial flora which results from antibiotic therapy. Because no unequivocal or absolute diagnostic aid is available for species of Candida, we considered reevaluating the practicality of using moniliin for skin testing. The major portion of the work2 referring to the use of this antigen was published before 1939, when, except for the paper of Hill,3 the antigen was reported of little value in establishing a diagnosis.

SELECTION OF PATIENTS  During a six-week period in January and February, 1951, one hundred infants and children admitted consecutively to the medical services of Children's Hospital were tested with moniliin. Their ages ranged from 8 days to 14

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