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Article
June 1952

CHILDHOOD PNEUMONIA, A COMMON CAUSE OF BRONCHOPULMONARY DISEASE: Importance of Prophylaxis and Adequate Therapy

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the Chest Clinic, Genesee Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1952;83(6):755-762. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040100053004
Abstract

IT IS generally believed that childhood pneumonia, once a serious illness, no longer presents a major pediatric problem. Indeed, modern therapeutics do control the acute phase of this illness in most instances, and immediate complications have become rare. However, as the following study will attempt to demonstrate, current antibacterial treatment is not likely to prevent bronchopulmonary disease, a frequent aftermath of childhood pneumonia. The fact that pneumonia not only is an acute self-limited episode but also may be a potentially chronic condition calls for more vigorous therapeutic and prophylactic measures than are usually held necessary.

Daily experience indicates that severe respiratory infections still are prevalent among children. Certain statistics1 even suggest a recent increase in these illnesses, including pneumonia. Undoubtedly, the number of cases which are reported and in which the patients are hospitalized no longer indicates the actual occurrence of pneumonia, since the use of sulfonamides and antibiotics

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