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Article
August 1953

SURGICAL TREATMENT OF INTUSSUSCEPTION IN INFANTS: Effect of Added Appendectomy

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School and Michael Reese Hospital (Dr. Richter); Resident in Surgery, Michael Reese Hospital (Dr. Silver).

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1953;86(2):184-185. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050080193006

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Abstract

THE EFFECT of appendectomy in the course of the surgical treatment of intussusception has deserved review in the light of recent experience. Since no report concerning this subject has appeared since 1945, when antibiotics became available for general clinical use, the following statistical analysis has been made of data from the Michael Reese Hospital records of all intussusceptions in infancy and early childhood for the period from 1946 through 1951.

Appendectomy in these circumstances is occasionally necessary to remove a necrotic or infarcted organ. It has been proposed as a method of preventing recurrent intussusception. It has also been performed for prophylaxis against future appendicitis and to obviate misleading implications of a right lower quadrant surgical scar.

Appendectomy after surgical reduction has often been condemned as being far too dangerous to employ routinely. An edematous inverted appendical stump has been reported as the leading point for recurrence of intussusception.

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