[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.206.12.79. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1954

PNEUMOENCEPHALOGRAPHY IN CHILDREN WITH MENTAL DEFECT AND/OR CEREBRAL PALSY: A Clinicopathologic Study

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Laboratory of Neuropathology of the Langley Porter Clinic, and the Departments of Neurology and Anatomy of the University of California School of Medicine.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1954;87(1):16-25. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1954.02050090016003
Abstract

IN THE pneumoencephalographic literature, the terms "cortical atrophy" and "cerebral atrophy" are widely used but apparently without regard to the actual pathology. To the radiologist, according to Davidoff and Epstein,1 cortical atrophy means merely enlarged sulcal markings and cerebral atrophy, enlarged ventricles. These authors admit the inaccuracy of such terminology when applied to congenital malformations of the brain, as a result of which they are confused with the true atrophies. Anderson2 calls attention to the fact that it is virtually impossible to distinguish between these two types of disorder by means of the pneumoencephalogram.

Our investigation was based on an attempt to find possible x-ray criteria which might be used to differentiate between primary malformations and secondary brain pathology. It seemed to us that the most definitive method of doing this was by correlating pneumoencephalograms obtained during life with postmortem material from the same patients. Very few studies

×