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Article
May 1954

GASTRIC SUCTION IN INFANTS DELIVERED BY CAESAREAN SECTION: Role in Prevention of Respiratory Complications

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Department of Pediatrics, Howard University College of Medicine, and the Pediatric Service of Freedmen's Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1954;87(5):570-574. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1954.02050090558005
Abstract

INFANTS delivered by Caesarean section have received considerable attention because of the relatively high mortality and morbidity in this group. In some instances, the factors which make this type of delivery necessary also contribute to the morbidity. In spite of the large amount of work done, abnormal pulmonary ventilation, including atelectasis and asphyxia in the newborn, still presents a great problem. Gellis, White, and Pfeffer1 directed attention to the excessive amount of gastric amniotic fluid in infants of diabetic mothers delivered by Caesarean section. They proposed gastric suction as a preventive measure against aspiration and asphyxia in infants delivered by this operative procedure.

The purpose of this study is to investigate the amount of gastric content in infants delivered by Caesarean section, particularly from nondiabetic mothers, and to determine the effect of factors such as indication for operation, medication, anesthesia and birth weight upon the quantity of gastric fluid

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