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Article
July 1954

ACUTE INFECTIOUS LYMPHOCYTOSIS: Report of an Outbreak

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE; BROOKLYN
From the Department of Pediatrics, Kings County Hospital, University Division.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1954;88(1):15-24. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1954.02050100017003
Abstract

IN THE YEAR 1941, Smith1 described an entity called acute infectious lymphocytosis, or, as it is widely referred to in the foreign literature, Carl Smith's disease. It is a benign disease of unknown etiology, occurring ubiquitously in a sporadic and epidemic fashion. A tabulation of reported cases has resulted in the designation of four major groupings of the disease: (1) asymptomatic; (2) gastrointestinal (diarrhea, vomiting, and acute abdominal conditions); (3) respiratory, and (4) central nervous system (meningoencephalitic).

The purpose of this paper is threefold; first, to report a carefully observed case of acute infectious lymphocytosis; second, to present a study of an outbreak of this clearly defined disease; and, third, to review the salient features of the disease so that one can easily distinguish it from other more serious illnesses.

REPORT OF CASE  F. C., a 3-year-old white boy, was admitted to the Kings County Hospital on Jan. 20,

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