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Article
February 1955

HEMORRHAGIC INFARCTION OF TESTIS IN NEWBORN: Relationship to Testicular Torsion

Author Affiliations

U. S. Army Reserve; U. S. Army; U. S. Army
From the Pediatric Service, Department of Medicine; Laboratory Service, and Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Fitzsimons Army Hospital, Denver.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1955;89(2):240-245. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1955.02050110282019
Abstract

THE FINDING of a tumefaction within the scrotum of a child is a distressing experience to parents and demands the utmost clinical diagnostic acuity of the attending physician. The urgency for prompt attention, usually through surgical approach, is stressed by all standard texts. The differential diagnosis includes congenital anomalies, vascular disturbances, traumatic injuries, infections, and neoplasms. An instance of firm testicular enlargement noted at birth in an infant delivered by Caesarean section and reflecting torsion of the spermatic cord serves as the basis of this brief report.

REPORT OF CASE  A white boy was delivered by Caesarean section after 37 weeks of gestation. The mother was an 18-year-old diabetic, who was adequately controlled on 85 units of isophane (NPH) insulin daily. The mother was a primagravida, blood Group A Rhnegative, serologic studies negative. The physical examination showed a large flabby infant weighing 3487 gm.; his skin and subcutaneous tissue appeared

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