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Article
July 1956

TORSION AND INFARCTION OF THE NORMAL OVARY: A Cause of the "Acute Abdomen"

Author Affiliations

Los Angeles
From the Department of Surgery of the College of Medical Evangelists, White Memorial Hospital.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1956;92(1):57-59. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1956.02060030051011
Abstract

WHILE acute abdominal symptoms are not infrequently due to torsion of an ovarian cyst, such symptoms from spontaneous torsion of the pedicle of a normal ovary are rare. Downer and Brines,3 in 1931, collected 18 cases from the literature which they considered to be true examples of torsion of the normal ovary. They included only children and young unmarried girls, in order to exclude the possibility of inflammatory disease of the adnexa as a possible predisposing cause of torsion. Their patients ranged in age from 4 months to 16 years. In addition, they reported a case of their own in a 7-year-old girl. Baron1 also reported an instance of torsion of a normal ovary in a 7-year-old girl, and, later, torsion and infarction in the remaining ovary of the same child.2 Another example occurring in a 7-year-old child was briefly reported by Smith4 in 1950. We

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