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Article
September 1956

CUSHING'S SYNDROME IN CHILDREN ASSOCIATED WITH ADRENAL CORTICAL CARCINOMA: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

Author Affiliations

Washington, D.C.
From the Department of Pathology, The Children's Hospital of The District of Columbia.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1956;92(3):297-307. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1956.02060030291008
Abstract

THE ASSOCIATION of adrenal tumors with the clinical picture now identified as Cushing's syndrome was first observed by Cooke * in 1756. Cushing,2 in 1932, collected 12 similar cases and concluded that pituitary basophilism was the underlying lesion. Cushing's original concept has been modified as a result of subsequent investigations.† In the pediatric age group Cushing's syndrome is most frequently caused by malignant adrenal tumors. Basophilic adenomas of the pituitary, while rare, have been reported in children in the absence of adrenal pathology.‡ The only case of Cushing's syndrome in a child caused by adrenal hyperplasia was described by Chute and his colleagues14 and occurred in a girl 8 years of age. Albright and Forbes § believe that all cases of Cushing's syndrome in infancy are caused by malignant adrenal tumors. Recently, however, Powell15 has observed an infant, age 3 months, with Cushing's syndrome who was found at

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