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Article
July 1961

Infant Pneumatosis Intestinalis: A Case Resulting in the Death of a Premature Infant Fifty Hours After Delivery

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
Department of Surgical Pathology Barnes Hospital, 600 S. Kingshighway (10).; Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit.

Am J Dis Child. 1961;102(1):110-114. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1961.02080010112018
Abstract

Pneumatosis intestinalis is a disease characterized by the presence of gas-filled cysts within the bowel wall. The disease has most commonly been called intestinal emphysema, cystic lymphopneumatosis, peritoneal pneumatosis, and gas cyst of the abdomen. The case reported here demonstrates involvement of the esophagus, stomach, small and large bowel. The disease resulted in death 50 hours after delivery.

Pneumatosis intestinalis is well known in Europe, but only recently reviewed in the American literature. The disease was best documented in adults until 1949,6 when Judge et al. reported on 17 pediatric cases,1 more than doubling the known cases in infants and children up until that time. MacKenzie in 1951 added another 13 pediatric cases from various sources.2 Regular reviews have appeared since that time.10,11

Report of Case  The patient was born R.O.A. following 5 hours of active labor, of which the second stage was half an hour

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